The DiRoberto Team


There was a time when moving across the country was a trip into the unknown. For some, that prospect may be an exciting one. For a homeowner with bills to pay or children to raise, the more you know about a place the better.

Fortunately, today’s technology equips us with tools to learn everything (or almost everything) we need to know about a place without ever visiting. With the use of statistics, maps, and first-hand accounts, would-be homeowners can put in their researcher hats and get a feel for a place without ever even visiting.

In today’s post, I’m going to introduce you to some of those tools. So, if you’re thinking of making a long distance move sometime in the near future, read on for a list of the most useful resources that will help you along your search.

Cost of living

Most of us would love to move to Hawaii or San Francisco, but let’s face it--cost of living differences can make a huge impact on our ability to move wherever we want. Fortunately, there is reliable data on the specific cost of living for different parts of the United States.

Nerdwallet’s cost of living calculator lets you enter your current city and income and then compare what you would need to earn (on average) to move to a city of your choice. Moving to Boston, MA from Denver, CO, for example, would mean a 34% increase in costs like housing, groceries, transportation, etc.

Do you freelance or work from home and have the ability to travel wherever you want? If so, check out the Nomad List. It lets you compare housing costs, safety, weather, and--perhaps most important for freelancers--internet speeds in cities around the country and around the world.

How’s the weather?

Another important consideration for long distance moves is the climate. Not only will it determine your wardrobe and comfort level, but it also could mean more expensive heating in the winter or air conditioning in the winter.

To check out the average monthly temperatures and precipitation levels, check out U.S. Climate Data.

School scores

It’s hard to judge schools based on a few numbers, and it’s best to see what kind of programs and classes they’ll offer for your children as well. However, to get a glimpse of the nearby schools, you can check out City Data or NeighborhoodScout.

Safety

Safety is always a concern when visiting or moving to a new place. Fortunately, there are several good sources of information for neighborhood safety.

When we think of safety, most of us think of things like crime rates. NeighborhoodScout provides all the data you’ll need on crime. However, there are other safety concerns that should be addressed.

The CDC provides health data for 500 U.S. Cities. And, if you’re worried about lead exposure, this interactive map from Reuters has you covered.


When you’ve gone through the lengthy and tiring process of seeking out, bidding on, and buying a new home and then sell your home, the last thing you want to worry about is cleaning your old house before you leave.

 However, there’s multiple reasons you’ll want to ensure your old house is clean before you leave. First, as a common courtesy, you’ll want the new owners of your home to have a good first experience and to maintain your rapport with them after closing day. However, there are also legal and financial issues at play.

If your contract states that your home needs to have been “broom-swept” or some other form of cleaning before you leave, then your new owners could technically postpone closing. Furthermore, some states have laws requiring that homes are cleaned by their previous owners before they move out.

 Although it can be difficult to define just how clean a home needs to be, legally speaking, your best option is to do your part to leave the home relatively clean, whether that means cleaning it yourself or hiring a cleaning company.

Legal reasons for cleaning your old house

As mentioned earlier, some states state cleaning requirements in the purchase contract when you sell your home. Their definitions of clean can often be vague, but usually include sweeping floors, wiping down surfaces, stripping nails and hangers from walls, and carrying out all furniture and garbage.

These rules are mostly designed to protect people who purchase a home from getting stuck with bulk items and other surprise issues that they’ll have to pay for.

An exception to this is when your home is sold “as is” or when you have some form of written agreement between you and the new owner that some part f your home will be left as is.

Cleaning your house

The ideal time to clean your house is once you’ve moved everything out. However, if you’re moving over a long distance, you might not be able to return to the house once it’s empty to give it a final cleaning.

In this case, your best option is to have your furniture and boxes packed away neatly in the garage, or in the corner of one room. Doing so will allow you to sweep, clean surfaces, wipe down cabinets, and so on, while your belongings are still in the house.

Just be sure to keep a broom handy once you’ve put everything on the moving truck so you can give one last sweep of the floor before you say goodbye to your old home.

Cleaning checklist

It can be difficult to keep track of everything you’ll want to clean before you move out, so here’s a list to go by:

  • Sweep all floors

  • Vacuum all carpets

  • Wipe down cabinets, shelves

  • Try to sweep under appliances, oven, etc.

  • Spray sinks and tubs, leave air freshener in bathroom

  • Wipe inside of refrigerator, if applicable

  • Remove all nails from walls

  • Do a final walkthrough and remove any trash you’ve missed


If you recently bought or sold a house, it may be only a matter of weeks before moving day arrives. As such, you may want to start planning ahead and contact a moving company to help you prepare for the big day.

Ultimately, not all moving companies are created equal. And if you make a poor selection, you risk encountering problems with your moving company as you try to take your belongings from one address to another.

Differentiating one moving company from another can be simple. In fact, there are several questions that you should consider before you hire a moving company, and these are:

1. What do I need from a moving company?

Moving from a big house to a small one is very different than relocating from an apartment to a home. Thus, you should consider your moving day needs and tailor your search for a moving company accordingly.

Don't forget to evaluate your moving day budget too. If you consider how much money is at your disposal, you can map out a search for a mover and discover a moving company that falls within your price range.

2. What services does a moving company offer?

Many moving companies will help you pack up your belongings, move them to your new address and help you unpack. Comparatively, some moving companies only offer limited support on moving day.

Think about which moving day services you'll need before you choose a moving company – you'll be glad you did. If you know what you want out of a moving company, you can narrow your search and quickly find a mover that will match or exceed your expectations.

3. What are past clients saying about a moving company?

Oftentimes, it helps to look at client reviews for moving companies. These insights can help you understand what it is like to work with a particular moving company before you make your final decision.

If customers frequently rave about a moving company, this is a positive sign. In this instance, you may want to move quickly to hire a moving company for your upcoming relocation.

On the other hand, a moving company that receives many negative reviews should raise red flags. If most customers are not satisfied with the support they receive from a particular moving company, you may want to consider other movers.

Finding the right moving company may seem difficult, particularly for individuals who have only a limited amount of time to relocate. But if you collaborate with a real estate agent, you may be able to discover the ideal moving company in no time at all.

In addition to helping you buy or sell a home, a real estate agent will make it easy for you to enjoy a seamless move. A real estate agent likely can put you in touch with the top moving companies in your area. As a result, a real estate agent can help you find a great moving company, regardless of when you need to relocate.


Proper hydration on moving day is paramount. Because without the proper hydration, your moving day team risks wearing down quickly. Perhaps even worse, moving day team members may feel exhausted as they lift large, heavy items – something that may prove to be disastrous.

Fortunately, there are many quick, easy ways to guarantee that your entire moving day team stays hydrated – here are three tips that you need to know.

1. Pick Up Lots of Beverages

Learn about your moving day team and the drinks they like – you'll be glad you did. If you learn your moving day team's drink preferences, you can pick up beverages that you'll know they'll enjoy on moving day.

When in doubt, it pays to purchase lots of water and sports drinks. These beverages help cleanse the body and will allow your moving team to maintain its energy levels throughout the day.

If possible, you may want to avoid purchasing caffeinated beverages as well. Caffeinated beverages may actually cause an individual to become dehydrated over time. Thus, you may want to provide only a limited amount of caffeinated beverages on moving day.

2. Store Your Drinks in a Cooler That Is Easy to Access

If your refrigerator has already been moved out of your house, there is no need to worry. Purchase a water cooler and lots of ice, and you can provide your moving team with cool, refreshing beverages at any time.

Keep this cooler in a central location and tell your moving team members exactly where they can find it. That way, if a moving team member starts to feel sluggish, he or she can stop, grab a drink and immediately start to revitalize the body.

3. Plan Plenty of Breaks

On moving day, give your moving team plenty of opportunities to stay hydrated. By doing so, you can reduce the risk of dropped items, injuries and other moving day problems.

Schedule at least one break per hour, with the break lasting a minimum of 10 minutes. Also, after a few hours, you may want to provide your moving team with an extended lunch break that gives all team members a chance to stop and grab a bite to eat.

If you need additional assistance planning for moving day, you may want to contact a professional moving company as well. This business hires courteous, professionally training moving specialists who will make it simple for you to take all of your belongings from Point A to Point B.

Lastly, a real estate agent may help you find the best moving companies in your area. This housing market professional can help you buy or sell a residence, as well as put you in touch with the top moving companies in any city or town, at any time.

Ready to transform an ordinary moving day into a successful one? Use the aforementioned tips, and you can guarantee that your entire team can stay hydrated as your moving day progresses.


Moving day is an exciting day but it’s also a lot of work and can even be a little stressful. Everything is boxed up and feels near impossible to find when you need it. Avoid scrambling through boxes to find a trash bag or paper towels.

Be prepared on moving day no matter what comes your way with a cleanup toolkit on hand.

Messes happen even on moving day. By packing a special box that is clearly labeled with these items inside you’ll be ready for anything.

  • Ziplock bags

  • Permanent marker

  • Trash bags

Have ziplock bags on hand to wrangle up loose screws and other bits and bobs. Use a marker to write on the bag what the contents belong to. Trash bags are for the obvious: trash. No matter how much you clean out and clean up you will find you have some sort of trash on moving day. Have at least one ready and waiting.

  • Dustpan and brush

  • Paper towels

  • Window spray

  • All-purpose spray

  • Dusting clothes

  • Microfiber cloths

  • Spray bottle

For messes left behind by the previous owners and any spills that may happen. Dust items before putting them away on shelves or hanging back up on walls. Wipe down windows and mirrors. Run a dusting cloth over shelves and banisters. And always have a few paper towels at the ready - just in case.

  • Hand soap

  • Hand towels

  • Toilet paper

  • Plunger

Because the bathroom will be the first to be used so have the essentials in place. Let’s be honest, these are not the things you want to dig to the bottom of a box for. Pull these out and set up the bathroom as soon as you first step into the new house.

  • Air freshener

  • Disinfecting wipes

Not necessities, but certainly nice-to-haves. Wipe down counters, doorknobs and switch plates with a disinfectant wipe. Air fresheners take care of any funky smells left behind from previous owners or from sitting vacant for a while.

Having a cleaning kit on hand and at the ready allows you to clean up as you go. You don’t want to start cleaning up after you’ve unpacked and put everything away. Do it beforehand for an easy, seamless moving experience.  

Tackles messes as they come up, proactively clean as you start moving items in and avoid digging through boxes to find disinfectant wipes or a trash bag. Clearly label your box in large print and/or color code it with a bright colored packing tape. This way you’ll know exactly which box has your supplies and where it is at all times.

Make your new house your home by freshening it up before unpacking. It will feel so good to have a clean organized home from day one.




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